Natalie: By the time Ann and Mary had come, we were still brainstorming all of that but what came out that day was they were really focused on the children of the Lockout. So what happened to all the children?

Natalie Leyden, Teacher, St Brigid’s, Haddington Road

Each of the girls told a slightly different version of the story of the Lockout when Ann and Mary visited the school.

Case Study: St Brigids NS

One of the aims of the project is to develop the children as independent researchers. This means resisting the urge as adults to feed them all of the information or do the research for them. The ability to identify relevant material and cross-reference information is such a useful skill and the project encouraged teachers to develop this approach within the classroom.

Natalie Leyden, the teacher from St Brigid’s Haddington Rd, told the rest of the team about the girls’ focus within the project.

By the time Ann and Mary had come, we were still brainstorming all of that but what came out that day was they were really focused on the children of the Lockout. So what happened to all the children? There was a kiddies’ scheme that happened during the Lockout, which was where people took the children to England, to live in England during the time their families were on strike because they didn’t have the resources to feed the children and look after them at the time. So they really ran with that – they found that really interesting.

“I think that when we talk about empowering children as researchers, this is what we had in mind.”

-Ann Donnelly, Artist

By the time Ann and Mary had come, we were still brainstorming all of that but what came out that day was they were really focused on the children of the Lockout. So what happened to all the children? There was a kiddies’ scheme that happened during the Lockout, which was where people took the children to England, to live in England during the time their families were on strike because they didn’t have the resources to feed the children and look after them at the time. So they really ran with that – they found that really interesting.

Orla: Are you surprised by the direction that it’s taken?

Natalie: Yeah, I was surprised that they don’t really care about the strike: they care about the children. To them, they want to know what’s going on with the kids. They said, “Oh yeah, you feel sorry for the families,” but they are much more focused on the children. Yeah, it was surprising at first but as I say they really ran with it. I just let them at it and they are going for it.

-Natalie Leyden, Teacher, St Brigid’s, Haddington Road